Dear Christian Evangelicals: Please watch Dallas Buyers Club, since you liked McConaughey’s speech so much.

by Nicole Plyler Fisk

When I logged onto my Facebook newsfeed after the Academy Awards this past Sunday, I was surprised/not surprised to see the Christian evangelicals with whom I grew up in my small, conservative town delighting over Matthew McConaughey’s Oscar acceptance speech, specifically this part:

“Now, first off, I want to thank God, because that’s who I look up to. He’s graced my life with opportunities that I know are not of my hand or any other human hand.”

I’m not surprised, obviously, that Christian evangelicals like this part, because . . . well . . . McConaughey says flattering things about God, of whom they’re big fans.

A sampling of the headlines/status updates being shared (and obsessively “liked” or “amen-ed”) include: “A Real Man thanks God 1st — Oscar recipients take note! Thank you Matthew McConaughey for reminding everyone how it’s done” from http://www.godfruits.com

and

“INCREDIBLE . . . COURAGEOUS . . . TRULY INSPIRATIONAL . . . About the best Oscar Acceptance Speech ever” from a status update.

I’m surprised, because among those lauding Matthew McConaughey are the most antigay “Christians” around — and I’m including Rush Limbaugh and Rick Perry in that count. Obviously, they haven’t seen the film and know nothing about the role with which God “graced [McConaughey’s] life.”

Because here’s the thing (spoiler alerts to follow): McConaughey plays Ron Woodruff, a homophobic cowboy who — after discovering he has AIDS — is rejected by his homophobic community. This is 1985 Texas, after all, and both Woodruff and his “friends” at the time had thought of AIDS as a gay-only condition; the latter become “suspicious” of Woodruff after his diagnosis and consequently drive him away: from his favorite bars, from his home, from his work — from life, as he knows it.

What begins as a struggle for Woodruff’s own self-preservation ends as a struggle on behalf of the AIDS-afflicted community that embraces him and that he learns to embrace (literally) in return.

The film traces his progression from point A (a beer-guzzling, womanizing member of the straight community, because — apparently — being a spectator of girl-on-girl action is “hot”/cough/hypocrisy); to point B (someone who is willing, though reluctant, to share space with a transsexual, depicted visually as he and Jared Leto’s character sit at opposite ends of a park bench); to point C (someone who, in becoming marginalized himself, discovers a more authentic community — one defined by acceptance and love and sacrifice, depicted visually as one of the most touching embraces in film history).

Once he learns the value of this community, he becomes not only willing but also passionate about fighting for it, on both a local level (if you see one clip from Dallas Buyers Club, do yourself a favor and watch the following — here, with director’s commentary)

and a national one. The truth is: he defies a federal government actively ignoring/demonizing AIDS in order to save the lives of people who are declared expendable (just watch the trailer; you’ll get the idea):

Since Sunday, some Christian evangelicals have learned the plot of Dallas Buyers Club on their own. The result? Blog posts like “Matthew McConaughey is Not My Hero,” in which a Christian blogger claims the movie “poisons the hearts and minds of our men, women, and young people.” Some seem embarrassed to have praised him; others defend his acceptance speech, still, as praiseworthy, while shaking their heads about the role. Marty Duran, a blogger for The Christian Post, decides that McConaughey is probably a “young believer,” and as such, will surely “grow” and then stop making movies like Dallas Buyers Club. sigh.

Another possibility: McConaughey’s spirituality inspired him to make Dallas Buyers Club in the first place, since defending, loving, and protecting the marginalized was the modus operandi of the historical Jesus (see the “Seven Woes to the Scribes and Pharisees” for his epic takedown of the religious elite; see his life for his affirmation of “the least of these”). Whatever the case, McConaughey has made perfectly clear where he stands on gay rights: “You know, I have some good friends of my own who happen to be gay, and when it comes to gay, straight, or whatever, I’m for anything life-affirmative. I’m for gay power, straight power, male power, female power; everybody should feel empowered without oppressing anyone who’s different. You know those World Cup banners about tolerance? I always thought that was one short. No, don’t just tolerate me. Understand and accept me.”

Matthew: amen.

And dear Christian evangelicals (you too Rush Limbaugh and Rick Perry): may the man you so admire for his Oscar acceptance speech introduce you to the most wonderful people with whom you may be unfamiliar — those in the LGBT community. Perhaps you’ll be open-hearted and open-minded enough to repeat what an octogenarian said to Jared Leto, after seeing the film:

“I don’t really know these people but I’m glad that I do now.”

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